A kind God would oppose progress

A kind God would oppose progress

One might wonder why a kind God would oppose progress so strongly. One response may be that “progress” would have been seen uniquely in contrast to is the situation for present day people who are caught inside the limits of development. Indeed sociobiology gives a potential response. According to the famous Vulcan, God might have wanted his favorite creatures to live long and prosper.

Resources are more likely to be plentiful in a small group of nomadic individuals because, like most migratory animals, they must simply move on when they become scarce. In that unique situation, itinerant life would permit free relocations into “terrains of milk and honey.” Likewise, on the grounds that the gathering number is little starvation is more outlandish – that is one justification behind limits on the gathering size in the first place. What’s more, since there is a fundamental ancestral and hereditary powerful the social dominance hierarchy would be less progressive. Predominance and rank would be less characterizing factors on the grounds that in a moderately little gathering the endeavors and work, everything being equal, would be fundamental. This indicates that no slaves, kings, nobles, or poor commoners would exist. An environment of social collaboration expanded the gathering’s possibilities of endurance. The Old Testament would be more natural and pantheistic than one might expect because it would align with evolutionary principles and God’s nature.

Another element could be involved. Agricultural and urban settlements only emerged around 8,000 years after the arrival of modern man around 250,000 years ago. That implies for almost a fourth of 1,000,000 years, our species lived in little gatherings, which not just impacted how they conveyed, worked, moved, mated, ate and drank yet in addition how they venerated and deciphered the powers of nature. That is such a long range of time that one would expect mental layouts, feelings, discernments and, surprisingly, social senses to have become so dug in custom, legend and experience that moderately unexpected changes – especially with respect to populace development and hereditary blending would have made gigantic pressure. The Old Testament may also be interpreted in that light as an effort to alleviate stress, a means of bringing the good old days back to a species that has recently become urbanized and is experiencing civic distress.