A Journey Through 1980s Music

A Journey Through 1980s Music

A Journey Through Music of the 1980s Tanya Fillbrook’s work. Are you making silly “soppy poppy” sounds in your head? No! Since the beginning of the 1980s, I have been listening to the top 40 artists, and I still do. From the early synthesizer sound and disco vibes in between to the new wave revolution, the trilling of new American rock bands, and the beginnings of hip hop, there are a plethora of amazing one-hit wonders. In this decade, everything opened up, and musicians tried out ever-expanding forms like shape-shifters. Additionally, the many artists at the time were extremely adaptable. The disco scene continued as we all hit the dance floor at the beginning of the decade, and the “Saturday Night Fever” craze persisted. We were enchanted by Donna Summer’s hypnotic songs, which are still highly addictive today. A few punk bands, like the Stranglers and the Ramones, were still around, and now Irish rock bands like U2 were performing. In 1980, their debut album, “Boy,” was released. The beginning of electric pop and “the new romantics” followed. Gary Numan and Kraftwerk, a German band, were among the first to experiment with the experimental synthesiser sound of The Human League. Reggae and ska, which combined sweet Caribbean Calypso and American jazz at the beginning of the decade, also took center stage. Think, UB40, Frenzy, and Bo Selecta. The “new romantics,” including Spandau Ballet, Adam And The Ants, and Duran Duran, maintained the boy band awe. I’d like to add that both Adam and the Ants and Planet Earth’s Duran Duran had a significant impact on my character and life. Shakin Stevens withdrew from Top Of The Pops in 1982. Culture Club’s first single, “Do You Really Want To Hurt Me,” blew up the charts and reached the sweet number one spot as the band took the stage. To feel a little closer to their hero, a rash of fashion-conscious fans turned to makeup, fabric paint, and scissors. After that, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, a Liverpudlian band, had their first and most controversial awakening. The dance floors erupted in mania! This brand-new style of music was making parents all over the world angry to no end. The middle of the decade began with bands like The Cure and The Mission’s Gothic, darker undercurrents, and who could forget the breathtakingly deep bass of “Lucretia” from “My Reflection” by The Sisters Of Mercy? I will add the ascent of another stock, a flexible American performer going by the name of Sovereign to this wealth of 1980s matchless quality. His music has many different themes. influenced virtually everyone on the planet, and despite selling more than 100 million records, he continues to be one of music’s most beloved figures. David Bowie, my favorite performer of all time, still sounded as fresh as when he made his first recordings in the late 1960s. His fame took off in the early 1970s with “The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust,” followed by “Ashes To Ashes” and one of my favorite Bowie albums, “Scarey Monsters And Super Creeps.”